Aves tennis builds one program

LENDING+SUPPORT.+A+large+home+crowd+of+girls+tennis+players+and+other+high+school+students+after+Sycamore%E2%80%99s+huge+victory+over+Mason.+The+decisive+win+sent+the+boys+Varsity+Gold+team+to+Columbus+for+the+final+four+of+the+state+tournament.
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Aves tennis builds one program

LENDING SUPPORT. A large home crowd of girls tennis players and other high school students after Sycamore’s huge victory over Mason. The decisive win sent the boys Varsity Gold team to Columbus for the final four of the state tournament.

LENDING SUPPORT. A large home crowd of girls tennis players and other high school students after Sycamore’s huge victory over Mason. The decisive win sent the boys Varsity Gold team to Columbus for the final four of the state tournament.

McDaniel's Photography

LENDING SUPPORT. A large home crowd of girls tennis players and other high school students after Sycamore’s huge victory over Mason. The decisive win sent the boys Varsity Gold team to Columbus for the final four of the state tournament.

McDaniel's Photography

McDaniel's Photography

LENDING SUPPORT. A large home crowd of girls tennis players and other high school students after Sycamore’s huge victory over Mason. The decisive win sent the boys Varsity Gold team to Columbus for the final four of the state tournament.

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Most sports have a boys and girls team, but rarely are they ever involved with each other. Aves tennis is the rare exception with all members on the boys and girls sides forming close bonds.

This phenomenon began manifesting over the last couple of years, when senior captain Kaitlyn Jiang, already being friends with many of the boys on Varsity Gold, decided to incorporate both teams into off season activities.

“It started with a few hangouts, then eventually everyone just clicked, and now they are part of our everyday lives,” Jiang said.

The Varsity Gold teams are especially tight knit, supporting each other during tough matches throughout their seasons.

“The boys come watch a lot of our matches, and we go watch theirs; it was amazing watching them beat Mason 3-2 to advance to the state final four last spring,” said Helen Sotropa, 11.

Sotropa references the boys’ quarterfinal state match between Mason and Sycamore, where Sycamore had lost the previous two times they had played. Through the support of the home crowd, however, they were able to change the tides.

Both sides often miss outside tennis clinics and after school activities to support their fellow Aviators.

“We needed the extra support to win, and that is really why I love being a part of Aves tennis and being there for each other on and off the court,” said Nikhil Sekar, 12.

With references on social media and at school, the Aves tennis comradery has sparked the hashtag “one program,” showcasing the special bond the players share.

They spend ample time off the court as well, with six pairs of Aves tennis couples attending homecoming together.

Aves tennis is an example of a high school sport bringing kids together and creating a community of people with shared interests who are able to create long lasting friendships and build #one program.

Test your knowledge about the boys tennis team, and the girls tennis team.

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