Women demand voices be heard

STRIKE A POSE. Multiple posters were available to take final shots with and to create a presence on social media with. Though no clear impact on 2018 elections is evident currently, participants learned how to make an impact in their community.

Keegan Sullivan

STRIKE A POSE. Multiple posters were available to take final shots with and to create a presence on social media with. Though no clear impact on 2018 elections is evident currently, participants learned how to make an impact in their community.

From Oct. 27-29, women met in Detroit, Michigan to discuss activism across the board. Though titled the Women’s Convention, its purpose was to speak out about all types of discrimination that impacts them.

Speakers included actress Rose McGowan, New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, and keynote speaker and California Representative Maxine Waters. The women shared their own experiences and how to fight back against all forms of oppression.

The convention’s theme was “Reclaiming Our Time,” based off of words from Waters prior to the event.

More than 4,000 women traveled to be a part of the workshops, discussions, and to network with other activists. The focus was what to do next and how to get everyone’s voices heard.

“Marching is just not enough. In the short term, we have to win in 2018,” said Linda Sarsour, one of the national co-chairs of the Women’s March, according to “Time Magazine.”

The convention had a huge focus on the daily news of the U.S.: mass incarnation, reproductive rights, transgender issues and more. Their goal was to make their presence felt in the 2018 mid-term elections.

Many potential candidates came (half the room raised their hands) and even more were persuaded to run following the weekend convention, according to “Time Magazine.”

Participants learned how to be more effective activists and were able to connect with activists across the nation. There were discussions and workshops centering being an inter-sectional (advocates for all races, abilities, orientation, etc.) feminist.

We are a women-led movement. We are the ones who set the strategy, but we believe men are part of the fight.”

— Linda Sarsour, national co-chair of the Women's March

“We are a women-led movement. We are the ones who set the strategy, but we believe men are part of the fight,” Sarsour told the “NY Times.”

Also, there were sessions regarding how to be heard in your community through organizing rallies, sending letters to representatives, funding campaigns, and how to defend everyone’s rights.

Another important part of the convention was how to deal with extremist views and how to make an impact on their community in spite of resistance.

Throughout the convention stretch and strengthening, exercises took place as well as interactive workshops. Days were packed with things to do from around 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. each day.

“This is not just a one-weekend event. This is about giving people tools to stay active and to grow our grass-roots effort,” said Gretchen Whitmer, who is running for Governor of MI, according to the “NY Times.”