Snoring causes more than scares

The Albert Einstein College of Medicines features its new discovery as its lead story. They have been known was one of the largest medical universities in the country. As their research continues they hope to find even more information. Photo Courtesy: MCT Photo Service
The Albert Einstein College of Medicines features its new discovery as its lead story. They have been known was one of the largest medical universities in the country. As their research continues they hope to find even more information. Photo Courtesy: MCT Photo Service

New studies show that snoring may lead to risks of behavioral and emotional problems. The study had been done by Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and was published in the journal Pediatrics.

“I know when people snore it can be really annoying but I wasn’t aware it could lead to bigger problems,” said Sarah Thompson, 10.

This has been the largest study yet as it follows 13,000 kids whose ages range from six months old to seven years old.

Of those kids, 45 percent of them did not have any breathing problems according to parents’ repots. The rest had symptoms of respiratory problems at a point in their infancy or childhood.

“I didn’t realize that so many people snored or that it was such a big deal,” said Elina Panteleyeva, 12.

Over time the team of researchers had found that children with sleep-disordered breathing were more likely to develop symptoms of behavioral or emotional disorders such as deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or anxiety by the age of seven.

“We’ve heard a lot about the importance of getting enough sleep but I guess this study also shows that it is important to be conscious of how you are sleeping as well,” said Sneha Rajagopal, 11.

Their conclusion was to warn parents to be self-conscious of their children’s breathing habits from a young age.

For more information click here.