AP Exams provoke questions

Advanced Placement exams,more commonly known as AP exams, have finally come and gone at SHS and the aftermath have left mixed reviews.

AP exams are the culmination to a year’s work. Students will usually purchase a review book to help them in the studying process. Two of the most common books are the “Princeton Review” and “Crash Course.” Image by Isaac Goldstein
AP exams are the culmination to a year’s work. Students will usually purchase a review book to help them in the studying process. Two of the most common books are the “Princeton Review” and “Crash Course.” Image by Isaac Goldstein

“I am so happy to be finished with my AP exams. For the last week, all I have been doing was studying, and it is great to finally relax,” said Jennifer Adamac, 11.

While some celebrate because they are over, others question why they even took these exams.

“For most of my APs, I am just taking the course again next year in college,” said Gabe Schenker, 12. “Sometimes, I do ask myself whether it was worth it to take all of them.”

Colleges are beginning to not accept AP scores as college credit. Brown University, although they accept certain AP scores for higher placement, does not accept college credit for these classes. They believe AP courses, while rigorous, do not show the true intensity of a college level course.

What students do not realize, though, is that College Board offers awards depending on how students score on their exams. The first level award is called the AP Scholar Award, which is granted to any student who receives scores of 3 or higher on three or more AP Exams.

“I had no idea that there were awards associated with AP exams. Teachers should publicize that information. Maybe it will get kids more motivated,” said Adamac.

Whether it is worth the numerous hours put into studying for these exams or not, it is a great accomplishment to go through the process, and students can now take a break and relax before the end of the year crunch that lies ahead.