Softball uses off-season to their advantage

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McDaniel's Photography

Sophomore Hannah Young runs to first base. Young plays on the Varsity Softball team. During the off-season, she keeps her body in shape through her other sports- cheerleading and the Flyerettes.

Hannah Frey

The off-season can be hard for athletes. Staying on their game even in the off-season can be the difference between making JV or making varsity.

In softball there are a few easy drills that will keep people on top of their game.

“On the off season I still work on softball. I often go to the batting cages and I play whenever I can,” senior Lydia Sloan said.

Hitting Drills

When working on hitting it helps to hit into a net. It allows players to focus on their mechanics and make sure that their swing is correct.

A good way to focus on mechanics is front hand and backhand drills. These drills strengthen both arms and make people swing correctly.

Another drill that is often helpful to improving an athlete’s swing is soft toss. Soft toss is when a person tosses the ball in front of the hitter and they hit the ball into the net. Soft toss helps with hitting because people can work on their timing and their mechanics.

“When I practice with my friends, we often do soft toss because it is a drill that needs two people,” sophomore Hannah Young said.

Staying in shape

The off-season is often a time that people will allow themselves to get out of the physical conditions that their sport requires. In softball you need to be strong and be able to sprint.

Weight lifting can help athletes keep their muscles toned so they do not lose any of their power. Sprinting will help people keep their speed up for when they are running the bases.

“I play volleyball in the fall, but in the winter I focus on staying in shape for softball by working with a pitching coach and by myself,” sophomore Liz Izworski said.