‘Divergent’ trilogy concludes with the brutal and shocking ‘Allegiant’

   The Divergent universe still isn't officially over. There will be a collection of short stories about Tobias' life entitled Four: A Divergent Story Collection released Feb. 11, 2014. There will also be a film adaption of Divergent out March 21, 2014. Photo courtesy of Ben Cohen.
The “Divergent” universe still isn’t officially over. There will be a collection of short stories about Tobias’ life entitled “Four: A Divergent Story Collection” released Feb. 11, 2014. There will also be a film adaption of “Divergent” out March 21, 2014. Photo courtesy of Ben Cohen.

   In the world of young adult series, the final book usually falls somewhere on a scale between amazingly beautiful and rushed and jumbled. The final book in Veronica Roth’s dystopian trilogy thankfully falls closer to the first.

Set in a society where one must choose a faction made up of either honesty, peacefulness, knowledge, selflessness, or bravery, Allegiant tells the story of what would happen if these barriers were broken down.

Allegiant has a much different feel to it than the preceding books in the trilogy. Everything feels much darker, grittier and violent. Especially with the knowledge that it is the final book and any character could die at any time, which many do.

The same flaws are still there. Overabundance of forgettable supporting characters and occasionally being too simple or predicable. That is not to say that there are not any giant twists and curveballs thrown in, because there are many.

The major flaw though, was the point of view change. The previous novels were set entirely from Tris’, the Katniss of the series, point of view. In Allegiant, Roth decides to write certain chapters from the point of view of her love interest, Tobias.

This decision ultimately makes more sense as the novel goes on, but I still constantly found myself forgetting whose point of view was whose.

The real success of the story comes from its stunning and controversial ending. Not many young adult authors would dare go to where Roth went, but boy I’m glad she did.

It gives the series much needed closure and wraps up many loose ends all while delivering a very powerful message of courage and sacrifice. It doesn’t go for the cheery happy ending, but instead goes with the more honest one.

That reason alone makes the series feel more worthwhile and proves Roth to have a truly great blend of bravery and knowledge. Something I think we all could use.