Richard Spencer sues UC

LAWSUIT+UP.+Cincinnati+is+not+the+first+University+Richard+Spencer+has+attempted+to+sue.+For+refusing+to+host+the+white+supremacist%2C+Spencer+has+also+filed+lawsuits+against+Ohio+State%2C+Penn+State%2C+Auburn%2C+as+well+as+Michigan+State.+%E2%80%9CI+do+not+understand+what+statement+he+is+making+by+suing+so+many+universities.+It%E2%80%99s+ridiculous%2C%22+Pan+said.

Tribune News Service

LAWSUIT UP. Cincinnati is not the first University Richard Spencer has attempted to sue. For refusing to host the white supremacist, Spencer has also filed lawsuits against Ohio State, Penn State, Auburn, as well as Michigan State. “I do not understand what statement he is making by suing so many universities. It’s ridiculous,” Pan said.

Popular white supremacist Richard Spencer has filed a two million dollar lawsuit against the University of Cincinnati for charging an “unconstitutional security fee” in preparation for his upcoming March visit.

In order to speak at the UC campus during students’ spring break, Spencer was charged a total of $11,333 which covers rental of the Zimmerman Auditorium as well as various security costs.

Spencer claims that the high dollar amount inhibits free speech and that the university’s discretion renders the situation unconstitutional. Throughout the controversy leading up to Spencer’s visit, UC has made consistent attempts at transparency for safety’s sake.

“Spencer was not invited or sponsored by any member of the university community, and like other non-sponsored speakers, he must pay a fee to rent university space. This includes a security fee,” said UC President Neville Pinto, on account of the situation.

Spencer’s stay at the University of Florida in Oct. of 2017 spurred an estimated $500,000 spent on security alone compared to UC’s charge. UC asserts that Spencer’s $11,333 fee relays a fraction of his visit’s estimated cost.

“UC is the only school in Ohio who, reluctantly, agreed to provide him a platform to speak on. Security is definitely needed during his speech because I fear for the students’ safety and well-being,” said Anita Pan, 12.