Students fear warming weather

With+mid-spring+temperatures+coming+about+extremely+early+this+year%2C+many+annual+plants+have+been+getting+confused.+Many+students+noted+that+instead+of+seeing+sparkly+snow+cover+lawns+this+January+they+have+been+seeing+budding+flowers+and+fresh+grass.+%E2%80%9CThis+is+not+quite+the+%E2%80%98white+winter%E2%80%99+we+had+been+warned+about%2C%E2%80%9D+said+Stacy+Lawrence%2C+9.
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Students fear warming weather

With mid-spring temperatures coming about extremely early this year, many annual plants have been getting confused. Many students noted that instead of seeing sparkly snow cover lawns this January they have been seeing budding flowers and fresh grass. “This is not quite the ‘white winter’ we had been warned about,” said Stacy Lawrence, 9.

With mid-spring temperatures coming about extremely early this year, many annual plants have been getting confused. Many students noted that instead of seeing sparkly snow cover lawns this January they have been seeing budding flowers and fresh grass. “This is not quite the ‘white winter’ we had been warned about,” said Stacy Lawrence, 9.

Bruns, Caroline Marie

With mid-spring temperatures coming about extremely early this year, many annual plants have been getting confused. Many students noted that instead of seeing sparkly snow cover lawns this January they have been seeing budding flowers and fresh grass. “This is not quite the ‘white winter’ we had been warned about,” said Stacy Lawrence, 9.

Bruns, Caroline Marie

Bruns, Caroline Marie

With mid-spring temperatures coming about extremely early this year, many annual plants have been getting confused. Many students noted that instead of seeing sparkly snow cover lawns this January they have been seeing budding flowers and fresh grass. “This is not quite the ‘white winter’ we had been warned about,” said Stacy Lawrence, 9.

Caroline Bruns, Webmaster

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It is finally winter, but it surely does not feel like it. With temperatures rising to around sixty degrees each day, it is hard to ignore the fact that our snow filled months may be becoming a thing of the past.
“Don’t get me wrong, I love warm spring-like weather, but I don’t love it in January. This used to be our prime snow-day month. Now it’s nothing but warm whether, clear roads, and blue skies,” said Kiri Basher, 9.
The cold season and snow play crucial roles in elevating student moral during the toughest quarter of the year– third quarter. For many students, it can be hard to stay focused on education when there is so much time before the school year is complete.
One thing that makes third quarter better is the underlying hope that the below thirty-two precipitation will bring about two hour delays, snow days, or at the very least, practice cancellations.
“The best third quarter of my life was definitely sophomore year because there was an entire snow week. It was insane and super fun. I loved the anticipation of a snow day the night before, performing the classic snow day rituals with my siblings, and then of course sleeping in the next day,” said Jessica Wocks, 12.
During this year, however, there has been very minimal ice, snow and slush across the Sycamore district. Although the temperatures that are currently underway are appreciated, they are not quite the definition of winter.
“I actually find it really concerning that we are having sixty or so degree weather in January. We have clear signs of global warming, yet nothing is being done about it,” said Allison Kossen, 12.
As temperatures continue to skyrocket, breaking all time January highs for Cincinnati, the overall frustration and optimism for the upcoming ‘cold’ months have steadily depleted. Although there is an overall positive stigma around warm weather, it brings about a deadly cycle.
The more praise these mid-spring temperatures get, the less push there is to find a solution to this rising problem. Without any solution, the warmth level will continue to increase. In the end, we will we wondering what happened to the snow? Where have our snow days gone to? Will they ever come back?
Who knows.

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