Colerain stands against walkout

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Colerain stands against walkout

Tribune News Service

Tribune News Service

Tribune News Service

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  Gun control is a problem that has been shown a lot of light in the media. In peaceful protest, students will join a “walk out” on March 14, walking out of school for 17 minutes as a protest to gun control due to several recent shootings.

  While most schools are fine with the protest, others like Colerain High School will have dire consequences if students participate in the walkout.

   At Colerain, if students choose to walk out, five things will occur:

  1. They will be considered truant from class and the absence will be unexcused.
  2. They will not be permitted to make up work due to the unexcused absence.
  3. They will not be permitted to re-enter the building on that school day after walking out.
  4. If they are athletes or performers and walk out, they will not be able to participate in events for the remainder of that school day or weekend if applicable.
  5. Disturbances by those choosing to leave will be dealt with as a discipline issue.

   “While I believe strongly in free speech and the right to protest peacefully, I have even stronger feelings about keeping our students and staff safe,” said Jack Fisher, the principal of Colerain High School, in his email to parents.

    Even though Fisher has made his point very clear. students and parents have been trying to convince Fisher to change his mind.

  “It did not seem to me that the kids were told what to do what was right; it seemed to me that they were told to shut up and sit down.

  “I understand [safety], but why not help these kids? Help these kids walk out. Make it safer so they can walk out, and let them make the statement,” said Joey Huber, mother of a Colerain student.

   So what is the right decision: to let students use their first amendment right of free speech and show their opinions or to keep students in class like any other day and not let them express their opinions?

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